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  #1  
Old 10/09/2007, 12:37 AM
ChadOwens ChadOwens is offline
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Carnation Coral question

I just got a large red carnation coral and at present i placed it in a spot with direct light. I just read up a little bit on these corals and everything i found said they like to be in a more shaded location. Will the coral be okay in direct light or should I move it, I really like where i have it....


Thanks

chad
  #2  
Old 10/09/2007, 10:36 AM
gh0st gh0st is offline
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It shouldn't be bothered by the light as long as it doesn't start getting overgrown by algeas. The important thing is really good flow, and LOTS AND LOTS of food such as Phyto, Oyster Eggs and other small sized food items.

These guys are VERY difficult, good luck, and check out the Dendro study group post here on RC, they have some good info.
  #3  
Old 10/09/2007, 02:01 PM
Hormigaquatica Hormigaquatica is offline
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HERE is a link to the Dendro thread
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  #4  
Old 10/09/2007, 04:43 PM
rhythmicfire rhythmicfire is offline
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To my knowledge carnation corals are not photosynthetic corals, so they will require/demand minimal lighting. However high flow is required because this coral is a filter feeder. I would strongly recommend target feeding them at least once a day, and twice a day is possible. Cyclopeeze, phyto, zoo, oyster eggs...
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  #5  
Old 10/09/2007, 05:38 PM
ChadOwens ChadOwens is offline
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Okay... I moved it to a more shaded location...As of now I'm feeding it phytoplankton 1-2x a day and I'll pick up some of the other foods you guys recommended.

Another question: Will this coral sting and kill other corals or polyps? Some of its arms are geting close to my green clove polyps... will they be okay if it happened to touch them?

Thanks

Chad
  #6  
Old 10/10/2007, 10:59 PM
aninjaatemyshoe aninjaatemyshoe is offline
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From what I've read, non-photosynthetic corals are not directly harmed by bright light. They are harmed by the algae that can grow on them. Considering the high nutrient load of tanks that would properly feed non-photosynthetics, algae will be that much more of a problem if you intensely light the tank. So you are left with either using low light (easier) or coming up with a good way to keep out algae (harder).

One idea I've had for mixing non-photosynthetic corals with photosynthetic ones is to have one day a week with no light. Corals can bare such intermittent dark periods far better than most algae (especially the fast growing microalgae and cyanobacteria). It might be enough to keep the algae in check without adversely affecting your other corals while also allowing for heavier feeding.
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  #7  
Old 10/11/2007, 01:15 AM
Hormigaquatica Hormigaquatica is offline
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One big factor with these corals appears to be flow too. A wide, but Very fast laminar flow seems to work best for them. I dont remember the study, but at least 1 researcher found that the Dendronephthea sp. he looked at gave the strongest feeding response with a flow of about 7" per second.

As others have mentioned, lighting is irrelevant so long as algae is not permitted to grow over top of the coral. In the wild, Dendros are often found in very clear water with very strong exposure to the sun. Flow and feeding are much more critical factors.
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  #8  
Old 10/11/2007, 01:20 AM
ChadOwens ChadOwens is offline
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Good info... thanks... i guess ill move it back into the light to an area with better flow.


Thanks

Chad
  #9  
Old 10/11/2007, 10:40 PM
rhythmicfire rhythmicfire is offline
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Yes, flow is very important because in the wild carnations are found in areas of ideal laminar flow (for feeding purposes I'd imagine). They are not found all over the reefs...only in select areas that provide them with this flow.
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  #10  
Old 10/15/2007, 01:28 AM
LegendLand LegendLand is offline
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Dendronepthya is not hurt by light, but it is not photosynthetic, it requires constant feeding of ALL small micron filter feeder foods. i failed in keeping 2 different species. i kept a red one longest (7months) i kept its frags for 5 months afterwards. it likes a medium to strong flow as well. & its best to target feed
 

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