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  #1  
Old 12/06/2007, 08:44 PM
StrategicReef StrategicReef is offline
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how to calculate amount of LR needed

I want to know how to accurately determine the pounds of LR needed for a system. Everyone's is different but mine as an example: I have a 80 gallon display and a 40 gallon sump.

But the sump is only half full when running of course.

It's not very hard to calculate subtracting the glass thickness the actual volume of water the system will hold when operational. For example the "80 gal" display tank holds more like 60 actually.

So if I determined the volume of everything is 80 gallons or so, do you add 80 lbs of LR if you believe in 1 LB per gallon rule?

I know it's a guideline and we go by the name of our tank, 55G, 30G etc when in fact it is usually much less water than the label. So that's where I am confused how to determine the amount of LR.

Thanks in advance.
  #2  
Old 12/06/2007, 08:58 PM
95accord 95accord is offline
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1-2 lbs per advertised gallon is a good rule of thumb to follow IMO

same for LS.....


ive always been told the more the better. (better to have too much than too little)
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  #3  
Old 12/06/2007, 09:06 PM
Acillaton Acillaton is offline
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1.5 lbs per gal. The more, the better, but you dont want to have full tank of rock. I would get about 120-150 lbs,put them into a main tank and those "leftover" pieces you cant fit or you dont like will go to the sump.Good luck.
  #4  
Old 12/06/2007, 09:07 PM
Acillaton Acillaton is offline
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Well I did forget to add...not all LR have the same density... so like a branching LR will take more room in your tank than dense rock...
  #5  
Old 12/06/2007, 09:13 PM
m2434 m2434 is offline
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Can't really, depends on the rock...
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  #6  
Old 12/06/2007, 09:43 PM
StrategicReef StrategicReef is offline
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I see some people recently make little small islands with alot of swimming room, they certainly do not follow this amount.
How do those system handle it?
  #7  
Old 12/07/2007, 01:03 AM
burks burks is offline
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They might have a sump packed full of live rock as well, or some great filtration.
  #8  
Old 12/07/2007, 01:15 AM
tmz tmz is offline
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The amount of rock you need depends on a number of things. The biolaoad of your system,wether or not a sand be is to be used and how deep will it be, what type of rock /more pourus rock provides more surface for denitrifying bacteria at less weight,and anything else that will affect your systems ability to denitrify. As a general arule of thumb, in my opinion 3/4 lbs to 1lb per gallon should be enough if properly cured and not too dense.
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  #9  
Old 12/07/2007, 04:21 AM
michaeldaly michaeldaly is offline
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I don't think there is any fixed rule. Buy enough live rock to create a nice rock structure in your tank andleave it at that. It's no use to go after certain lbs'g number if it will mean that your tank will look ugly with so much rock in it.
  #10  
Old 12/07/2007, 07:24 AM
Racing1 Racing1 is offline
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Put as much as you feel looks good. I do not use as much rock as alot of people because I want room for the fish to swim, and when you buy corals alot of the come attached to rock which will add to the system. I use a larger skimmer an do regular water changes with no ill effects...
  #11  
Old 12/07/2007, 11:25 AM
akaatomic akaatomic is offline
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Focus on making your tank desirable and functional. Come up with a rock layout that you like looking at that will make a good home for your livestock (while eliminating dead spots, etc...). It doesn't take much rock to support the average stocked tank. You want enough surface to support enough nitrifying bacteria to convert ammonia and nitrites. You will only grow as much bacteria as the food source permits and the majority of your rock surface is "dead" anyway (until you've overstocked). Buy 1-1.5lbs/gal as a grenade estimate. Setup your tank the way you like it and test once in a while.
  #12  
Old 12/07/2007, 11:44 AM
StrategicReef StrategicReef is offline
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I already have 50lbs aged LR say if I get 50lbs marcorocks (dead rock) would that support the system ?
  #13  
Old 12/07/2007, 12:40 PM
akaatomic akaatomic is offline
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Again, if you were to stock your tank as if it were a 50 gallon tak, then you have the right amount of LR. The fact that you have 120g of water just means that the waste is disipated over a larger area and may take a little longer to cycle out, but that's no big deal. I'd say that's a great start unless you plan on dumping 20 fish in there. Two things with marco rock: It has to be cured. Because it's dry it's covered in dead organics. Cure it in salt water for at least a week or two. Your best bet is to use your old water change water to cure it as this will also start seeding the marco rock with bacteria. It will be an excellent jump start. Again, shoot for two weeks. Second, marco rock is extremely light, so you won't need much. If you have the cash and can get 50lbs, go for it. You can throw the extra in your sump for critters to live in or use it for fragging/trading. If not, 25lbs would be good for now (it's more like 40lbs of live). Then, when you go to stores and see cool rocks, you can cherry pick them to improve the look of your tank as well as add much more diversity with the hitchhikers you'll get.
  #14  
Old 12/07/2007, 02:36 PM
tmz tmz is offline
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What is macro rock and where do you get it?
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  #15  
Old 12/07/2007, 04:19 PM
akaatomic akaatomic is offline
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www.marcorocks.com

Good stuff. Good guy.
 

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