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  #1  
Old 01/10/2008, 06:42 PM
LooseHip LooseHip is offline
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Krylon fusion peeling off?

My buddy and I both built internal glass overflows and painted them with krylon fusion paint. He water tested his and when he was draining it, the paint started peeling off the glass overflow... Any ideas why this would happen? The test was done with fresh water, Just curious I am wondering if it is the glass he used, or if KF doesn't bond well to glass when it becomes wet. I have a HOB overflow that acrylic painted with KF and have never had an issue with it.
  #2  
Old 01/10/2008, 08:00 PM
shyland83 shyland83 is offline
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fusion is made to apply to a plastic surface. It actually bonds or "fuses" to the plastic. when using on other surfaces it don't bond as well. If you scuff up the glass with some sand paper first you might have better luck, but i would guess it won't last long term either way.
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  #3  
Old 01/11/2008, 12:49 AM
LooseHip LooseHip is offline
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well that sux.... go figure though.
  #4  
Old 01/11/2008, 10:40 AM
Putawaywet Putawaywet is offline
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Definitely wrong choice in paint. An epoxy based spray would have probably been a better choice, but even then, no guarantees. I really can't think of much of any kind of paint off hand that will bond to glass and hold up for any period of time when exposed to saltwater.

Brett
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  #5  
Old 01/11/2008, 02:48 PM
FlamesFan FlamesFan is offline
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krylon is expoxy based...
  #6  
Old 01/11/2008, 02:53 PM
musty baby musty baby is offline
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Should have just bought some black glass
  #7  
Old 01/11/2008, 02:56 PM
RandyStacyE RandyStacyE is offline
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Black glass is SUPER expensive. There are shades of dark glass, but they are still transparent.

I forget the proper term ... colored glass or something, but this type of glass is simply already painted on the back. I have no idea if that paint is safe or what type of paint it is.

I just went with Krylon (not fusion) and painted the back of my glass overflow with it. I wonder how long it will hold up.
  #8  
Old 01/11/2008, 02:59 PM
RandyStacyE RandyStacyE is offline
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None of the glass companies near me had any in stock ... maybe that's the reason it would have been expensive.

If you are lucky enough to find someone who actually has some then that would definitely be the way to go. I didn't want to paint my glass, but it was the most economical alternative.
  #9  
Old 01/11/2008, 03:11 PM
musty baby musty baby is offline
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Hmm. I suppose it is possible that it's not stocked often in heavier thicknesses and could be more expensive for that reason. Having dealt with stained glass more than anything, I would have thought it would cost no more than a clear piece (as with stained glass). Maybe I'll have to make a few 1-piece black glass overflows and see if there's a market
  #10  
Old 01/11/2008, 07:00 PM
BeanAnimal BeanAnimal is offline
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Common "dark" or "smoked" glass:

#31 gray (aka Light gray)
#14 dark gray (aka Dark gray)

The dark gray is ALMOST black. I used the lighter gray because it was in stock. Enough for an overflow should only cost you a few bucks more than clear.

Your local glass shop will know what you are talking about. Most glass shops order the stuff precut to your dimensions... they don't stock it an cut it! There is no waste or "you must purchase the whole sheet" kind of nonsense. They simply place the dimensions into the computer and their wholesaler sends it to them.
 

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