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View Poll Results: Uv Sterilizer or run Ozone or None?
Uv Sterilizer 3 13.04%
Ozone 5 21.74%
None of the above (better off without - or use to help with disease outbreaks) 15 65.22%
Voters: 23. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
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  #1  
Old 01/23/2007, 11:18 PM
Criminal#58369 Criminal#58369 is offline
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Uv Sterilizer or run Ozone or None?

Which would you choose and why (which one is better?)
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  #2  
Old 01/24/2007, 01:11 AM
AllenFord_SC AllenFord_SC is offline
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I don't use either. I think the UV kills some of the beneficial bacteria along with the bad stuff. Ozone is just to risky for my taste. But there are lots of people who use both with great sucess.
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  #3  
Old 01/24/2007, 01:32 AM
sir_dudeguy sir_dudeguy is offline
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agree with both his points. UV just kills beneficial stuff (like pods) and ozone can be risky. And also like he said, sure, there will be tons of people who use both Just not my taste
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  #4  
Old 01/24/2007, 01:48 AM
MrPike MrPike is offline
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I was only ever worried about the risk when I didn't use ozone. I have used it for around a year now, and have found it quite helpful. I sometimes forget to change the carbon on the output of the reactor for a few months, and notice no negative effects.

That being said, I would concentrate on a better skimmer, better lighting, better flow before worrying much about ozone.
  #5  
Old 01/24/2007, 09:25 AM
greenbean36191 greenbean36191 is offline
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What is your goal with the unit? To prevent/control diseases or to clarify the water? If it's the first case then I vote for neither. Neither is effective at controlling pathogens in recirculating systems. If you want it for clarification then ozone would give you the best result.
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  #6  
Old 01/24/2007, 10:56 AM
Shagsbeard Shagsbeard is offline
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Why do people use UV? Is it truely misinformation that leads them to think that they help fight disease? I've never used it, nor have any plans too. UV sterilizes indescriminantly. That's great if you don't want any micro organizms to survive.

Why do people use Ozone? I've no idea on this one. It makes your skimmer more efficient or something.

It seems to me that both are solutions to problems that don't exist.
  #7  
Old 01/24/2007, 01:15 PM
Kiel'thalin Kiel'thalin is offline
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Ozone can be very beneficial in the filtration process if used correctly. Virtually all public aquariums in the U.S., as well as many European and Japanese facilities, use ozone for water purification. Why? Ozone disinfects water through oxidation. As ozone (O3) decomposes to O2 a great deal of energy is released, breaking apart other chemical elements. By breaking the bonds which hold the elements of an organic compound together, ozone has the ability to destroy bacteria, fungi, viruses, and large organic molecules. Basically it has the effects of another oxidizing agent, chrlorine, but without producing harmful chloramines that have combined with the organic compounds.
  #8  
Old 01/24/2007, 01:39 PM
WaterbugJenn WaterbugJenn is offline
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If i had a choice i guess ozone, which i dont have. On my reef after cycling i had a large isopod population. I did not use my UV sterilizer during cycling but decided to turn it on about three months in. Within afew weeks i could barely notice a single isopod. So UV definatly kills indiscriminatly, the big question is does it help to prevent diseases or not. I dont know, In three years i have not seen a disease outbreak in any of my tanks. Even the ones that i dont use UV on. So Why did i buy this thing, maybe just for the peace of mind i guess. In conclusion i have no info on whether it works for diseases or not. BUt it is confirmed that UV reduces your pod population. I now use my UV just periodicaly since i have why not use it. SO if i had a choice i think i would go with the Ozone or none at all
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  #9  
Old 01/24/2007, 01:42 PM
blackheart blackheart is offline
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what your saying, Kiel'thalin is true but you are still put free negatively charged ions into your tank to o what they please. They will attach and disrupt any compound without a complete shell of valence electrons. You dont know what kind of compounds these rouge ions are creating. You do make a point however, there is a reason why ozone is bad for you and you are just jumping to conclutions by assuming that only good things will happen by its release into your system.

also you say no chloramides are produced however, Ozonides will be produce and these are dangerous.

Finally i must say that ozone is deadlly and really should not be delt with by anyone who is not trained to deal with it. For all of you using it just be careful and dont take it for granted.

greenbean what do you think about this?
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  #10  
Old 01/24/2007, 02:05 PM
Tripspike Tripspike is offline
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Will follow thread
  #11  
Old 01/24/2007, 03:00 PM
Kiel'thalin Kiel'thalin is offline
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blackheart, true, I did forget to mention the dangers involved with ozone. I also suggest to fellow aquarist that ozone needs to be setup properly. Also, there should be more fail-safes provided to the consumer line of products involving o-zone. Again, if properly setup and you know what you are doing, it can be used as part of your filtration system effectively.
  #12  
Old 01/24/2007, 07:52 PM
greenbean36191 greenbean36191 is offline
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I certainly agree that ozone is dangerous for both the livestock and keeper if used improperly. However, it's been in use for water treatment (for humans and marinelife) for quite a while now and doesn't seem to have any harmful effects when used correctly. In fact, high levels are often used on spawning tanks and even then the larvae, which tend to be very fragile don't seem to be harmed by any residuals in the water. Usually, well designed systems include a UV sterilizer or carbon downstream to neutralize any harmful compounds created by the ozonator itself.
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  #13  
Old 01/25/2007, 12:01 AM
AllenFord_SC AllenFord_SC is offline
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I think the biggest concern I have with the use of ozne is the potential of a leak within the home. This is an excert from a great 3 part article by Dr. Randy on the use of ozone in the home aquarium:

"Ozone in the air can be a significant health hazard to humans. A recent EPA study (to be published in April of 2006 in Environmental Health Perspectives) shows that ozone can cause premature death at prolonged exposure levels as low as 0.08 ppm. That level is considerably lower than had been previously believed. Older studies had suggested that a level of 0.2 ppm was not a significant health risk. It is beyond the scope of the article to detail ozone's various health effects, but it should be apparent that if ozone can be used to oxidize and break down organic materials, then ozone exposure to humans, which are made up of organic tissue, is undesirable.

Since most aquarists do not have ozone detection meters (see below), how should they determine if they are potentially being exposed to undesirably high levels? Aside from not using ozone, which might be a reasonable choice for many aquarists for many reasons, including health, I would recommend the sniff test. It appears that most people can detect ozone in the air by smell at levels somewhat below 0.08 ppm. So, if you can smell ozone, it may or may not be at dangerous levels. It is quite possible, however, to use ozone in a manner where it cannot be smelled, assuming that the equipment and procedures are adequate, including passing the post-reactor air over a suitable amount of GAC (discussed in the next section). My advice, then, is that if you choose to use ozone, you do so in a way in which you cannot detect its odor. Is that a guarantee that you will suffer no harmful effects? No. Some people have a much poorer sense of smell than others. And future studies may show harmful effects even at levels below the threshold of detection by the human nose. But if I were using ozone, and I could smell it, I would take affirmative action to reduce the escape of the ozone gas."

This alone is why I don't use it.

Here is a link to the article:
http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2006-03/rhf/index.php

Just my .02
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  #14  
Old 01/25/2007, 12:06 AM
WaterbugJenn WaterbugJenn is offline
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I agree with ALLEN FORD this is probably the number 1 reason that has scared me away from Ozone.
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46 Bow FOWLR
72 Bow African Cichlid
10 Gal Pod and snail Hatchery
 

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