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  #51  
Old 12/31/2007, 01:02 PM
coralite coralite is offline
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That last one looks like a Symphillia which is a type of mussid, not a fungiid. the second disc coral you posted looks like it could color up to something unique.
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  #52  
Old 12/31/2007, 01:07 PM
icu2 icu2 is offline
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Could be on the symphyllia. Coloration on the orange one should continue to get better; it is eating well. If not that is ok as well .
  #53  
Old 12/31/2007, 03:57 PM
GoingPostal GoingPostal is offline
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So fungiid experts, my little rescue orange finally died, it never took to eating and stopped expanding about a month ago so I didn't think it was going to make it. I left it in the tank as I've seen plate skeletons with babies that popped up, is this common? I hate to take up space with a dead plate if there's no chance of anything coming back.
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Most people don't realize that large pieces of coral, which have been painted brown and attached to the skull by common wood screws, can make a child look like a deer.
*Jack Handey
  #54  
Old 12/31/2007, 04:02 PM
coralite coralite is offline
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The production of stalked juveniles (called anthoblasts) from stressed corals is much more common in Fungia than Cycloseris (the commonly orange disc corals). Production of anthoblasts by Cycloseris is much less likely on a completely dead polyp than one that has suffered injury to only a part of it's disc. If it was a Fungia I would say leave it in for another two months but since it is a Cyclo, if it was in my tank I would yank it and toss it in the fuge or behind the rockwork.
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  #55  
Old 12/31/2007, 06:43 PM
GoingPostal GoingPostal is offline
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How do you tell between cyclos and fungia? I've never been sure on this. I actually didn't realize there were some many different kinds before this thread, only seen the usuals plus a halomitra and diaseris on DD once. Guess I have to look around harder, my only source is online though and the good ones are $$$ and gone quick.
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Most people don't realize that large pieces of coral, which have been painted brown and attached to the skull by common wood screws, can make a child look like a deer.
*Jack Handey
  #56  
Old 12/31/2007, 10:54 PM
Sheol Sheol is offline
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Yep, Coral warfare is nearly as vicious as human warfare. & my newest Favia is my most aggressive coral. Sweepers almost every night.
I'd consider it again, but a 36 gallon bowfront dosent have the floorspace.

Matthew
  #57  
Old 01/01/2008, 11:51 AM
weaselslucks weaselslucks is offline
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Here is my little guy. how big are they known to get?

  #58  
Old 01/01/2008, 01:17 PM
Mental1 Mental1 is offline
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here's my new tongue. he's up on a rock. So far he seems fine but not sure if it is a good long term spot. What's his real name other than slipper or tongue coral. I know they are closely related to plates but are perhaps a bit more aggressive?


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  #59  
Old 01/01/2008, 03:21 PM
Caleb Kruse Caleb Kruse is offline
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Those questions about how big they get, and how to tell the difference are questions I've always wondered about.
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  #60  
Old 01/01/2008, 04:01 PM
Mental1 Mental1 is offline
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It behaves like a short tentacle plate coral, it has short tentacles, a mouth, and it inflates the same way. I just don't know what the difference is except that it is called a slipper or a tongue coral versus a fungia or short tentacled plate. Anybody enlighten us?
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  #61  
Old 01/01/2008, 05:28 PM
coralite coralite is offline
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Cycloseris is the smaller, flatter disc coral which commonly comes in solid neon green and orange. It has smoother septa and usually a flatter underside. These are not nearly as hardy in regards to fragging and they are much less likely to develop stalked juveniles from the skeleton if it is damaged.

Fungia grows much larger and it does not occur in solid green or orange. Instead they are usually colored yellow, green or brown, often with a purple rim and or purple mouth. Fungia will commonly exhibit a purple color where it has suffered mechanical damage or if it stressed. So dont buy that purple fungia for its color because it may or may not stay that way. It has a much thicker disc with a more concave underside. The septa tend to be a lot more toothy also. Fungia takes well to fragging as long as part of the mouth is present and it is the species which commonly produces stalked juveniles if tissue is caused to recede from part of the skeleton.
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  #62  
Old 01/01/2008, 05:44 PM
GoingPostal GoingPostal is offline
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Thanks so much for that explanation, I moved the dead plate to my main tank and it appears to have flesh regenerating on one tiny part. Maybe it's not a total goner yet but I don't have high hopes yet.
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Most people don't realize that large pieces of coral, which have been painted brown and attached to the skull by common wood screws, can make a child look like a deer.
*Jack Handey
  #63  
Old 01/01/2008, 07:52 PM
atzak atzak is offline
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I don't want to hijack, but what is this fish?

not a plate but their tankmate (for fun)
[/B][/QUOTE]
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  #64  
Old 01/01/2008, 07:54 PM
coralite coralite is offline
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It's a tripodichthys, according to joetbs. Tripod fish for short.
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  #65  
Old 01/02/2008, 05:34 PM
Caleb Kruse Caleb Kruse is offline
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I like this thread so
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  #66  
Old 01/02/2008, 05:55 PM
joetbs joetbs is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mental1
here's my new tongue. he's up on a rock. So far he seems fine but not sure if it is a good long term spot. What's his real name other than slipper or tongue coral. I know they are closely related to plates but are perhaps a bit more aggressive?


that's not a slipper - its a Lithophyllon sp. More like a cross between a plate & a chalice. You can actually frag those very simply and they grow good. I have one just like it and it's one of my faves
  #67  
Old 01/03/2008, 10:09 AM
Mental1 Mental1 is offline
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Cool -- thanks. I was wondering because I noticed several mouths eating and I thought that plates and slippers only have one mouth. Is it okay on the rock? Where is yours positioned?
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  #68  
Old 01/03/2008, 05:40 PM
joetbs joetbs is offline
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Mine are on rocks, i think they like a little more flow than the others. Some slippers and plates will have multiple mouths depending on the species.
  #69  
Old 01/03/2008, 07:38 PM
Mental1 Mental1 is offline
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Well I have it on a rock and it is getting flow. The tentacles are pretty long and it is inflated. Looks happy with where it is -- thanks for the info. I did not know slippers and plates would have multiple mouths. Thanks again. Each time I post I discover how much I do not know!
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  #70  
Old 01/03/2008, 07:55 PM
oldreefer76 oldreefer76 is offline
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A crummy pic of our plate ( crummy point & shoot camera) Plate have always been 1 of our favorites
  #71  
Old 01/03/2008, 08:05 PM
mdbrit mdbrit is offline
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I'd be interested in what types of lights/depths those in the know would recommend for the plates.
I'm just setting up a new Tech 70g which is 25" deep and I'm having trouble deciding on lights. I would like to be able to keep a plate or two.
Thanks.
  #72  
Old 01/03/2008, 08:25 PM
ViPeR_930 ViPeR_930 is offline
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Been following this thread and finally took some pics of my own collection.
This green one is so bright it's often the first thing my friends point out.


Orange/green



Purple w/ light blue blotches


Blood red w/ a green mouth, green rim, and white spots. I can't capture the true colors of this one for the life of me.


The tiny plate on the left came as a hitch hiker. It used to have some amazing deep purple stripes, but they faded for some reason. The other on the right I just got a couple days ago hoping it'll turn more blue.


Last edited by ViPeR_930; 01/03/2008 at 08:36 PM.
  #73  
Old 01/03/2008, 08:30 PM
coralite coralite is offline
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Man that's what I'm talking about. I knew there had to be another Fungiid lover out there. thanks for sharing the pics of super sweet specimens. That fuschia Cycloseris is freakin insane. I think the first green one you posted could be a small F. paumotensis like my avatar. if it stays oval shaped and elongate with strong stripes than it likely is a Paumotensis.

And the blue squamosa is not bad either.
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  #74  
Old 01/03/2008, 08:35 PM
ViPeR_930 ViPeR_930 is offline
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Here's an old pic I dug up of the red plate.
  #75  
Old 01/03/2008, 09:50 PM
wishntoboutside wishntoboutside is offline
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great pics viper. you got the collection very nice

Richard.
 

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